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Peru

En Periódico Online – Encuentro

I am in the newspaper again to educate society that exercise is so important to improve parkinson’s symptoms and improve quality of life. Estoy en el periódico otra vez. Todo para educar la sociedad sobre la enfermedad de Parkinson: El ejercicio reduce los síntomas y por lo tanto mejora la calidad de vida. Por favor poner comentarios en “Encuentro”. Gracias
Link to Newspaper: http://encuentro.pe/deportes/la-gimnasia-artistica-como-terapia-del-parkinson/

What is your strength or talent?

That may seem a strange question to use in a Parkinson’s association meeting. But that what I asked is very strategic. These people have parkinson! They have plenty of weaknesses. They are used to people asking them about symptoms and many suffer from depression, anxiety and lack of motivation. It is part of the disease though everyone is affected differently do not everyone has it.

The other reason I use such an approach is because I did a Masters in Community Development which is an aspect of social work and international development which approaches development from a different perspective. The role of the community development worker is to help the people themselves. 

One of the key methods is  asset-based development. Instead of going in and asking ‘what do you need’ or condensing statements or questions about their situation they look at the strengths they have. Helping people find their strengths means helping them see their worth and see how that could help each other. That is one of my aims with Activate – the Liga of Parkinson’s en Arequipa. 

I also wanted to avoid the tearful diagnosis stories this meeting and keep it more positive. Not to say we won’t do these stories but not everytime we meet. Instead we started with singing, actions and dancing to a children’s song with a good latino rhythm. This helped everyone loosen up and have a bit of fun. 

Feeling useful and valued brings people joy and my strategy is to get people involved in running the Liga. Let’s be honest it is a lot of work alone so having help will lighten the load too especially as the people get the hang of what is involved. Family of the people with 

Parkinson’s are also invited to help out too. 

We are hoping to start some sort of exercise classes for those interested so I asked if people could help find a location and teachers and or funding or the user pays. It could take some time. 

We also had life size person outline on paper and we had everyone yell  their symptoms, and we put up the labels on the body of where they related to.  They enjoyed being the experts on the disease as we of people learn about symptoms others have. 

We had about 16 people with Parkinson’s plus family. I have 42 contacts with Parkinson’s now and the Doctor just rang to say she has more people wanting to come so we a have penciled in the 11th of February for the next meeting in the same venue to keep things moving.

In all, exciting meeting and we hope and pray the enthusiasm continue. 

In the Newspaper – En el periodico

En Español abajo.

What a surprise? I was interviewed for a newspaper and today when I found out it was published we rushed to buy it, looked through all of it and started to think it must have been yesterdays paper. No, it was a full backpage. Amazing!

So thankful for the connections I am making to get this far. A person with Parkinson’s introduced me to the journalist and because she already knew of his struggle she was already sold on helping us out and wants to continue to do so.

By chance I ran into the family at the shops just now and was able to say thank you in person. Juan reiterated that Nelly was willing to write more stories. To which I replied “Yes! I am hoping your story will be next as I know you are a going to improve a lot right?” He smiled sheepishly. Let’s hope and pray! He is a great guy with a lovely family.

I have various friends helping with editing and other tasks which helps so much. It takes a village really. Thank you Josue, Ines, Noelia, Leydey, Yoselyn y David, and my kids. Hoping for more helpers soon. Any volunteers

The article is in Spanish but it explains about starting the Parkinson Association in my city, my exercise and the video I made which documents my gymnastics program which was shortlisted for the #wpc19 video competition.

En Español

¿Qué sorpresa? Fui entrevistado para un periódico hoy, cuando descubrí que estaba publicado, nos apresuramos a comprarlo. Lo revisamos todo y comenzamos a pensar que debía haber sido el periodico de ayer. Pero era una página detrás. ¡Increíble!

Estoy muy agradecido por las conexiones que me ayudaron a educar sobre la enfermedad de parkinson. Juan, un amigo con Parkinson, que me presentó al periodista, Nelly. Porque ella ya subia de la enfermedad de Juan, ya estaba convencida de ayudarnos y quiere continuar haciéndolo.

Por casualidad me encontré con Juan y su familia en las tiendas el mismo dia y pude agradecerles en persona. Juan reiteró que Nelly estaba dispuesta a escribir más historias. A lo que respondí: “¡Sí! Espero que tu historia sea la próxima, ya que sé que vas a mejorar mucho, ¿Verdad?” Él sonrió tímidamente. ¡Estoy orando! Son una linda familia.

Tengo varios amigos que ayudan con la edición y otras tareas que ayudan mucho. Realmente se necesita un pueblo. Gracias a Josue, Ines, Noelia, Leydey, Yoselyn, David y mis hijos. Esperando más ayudantes pronto.¿Quienes quiere involucrarse?

Los trabajos sean administrativo, diseño gráfico, buscando aliados en hospitales y lugar para clases etc.

El artículo está en español, pero explica acerca de cómo iniciar la Asociación Parkinson en mi ciudad, mi ejercicio y el video que hice que documenta mi programa de gimnasia que fue seleccionado para la competencia de videos en el congreso mundial de parkinson #wpc19.

https://diariocorreo.pe/edicion/arequipa/como-superar-el-parkinson-consejos-de-una-paciente-que-vencio-las-dificultades-928439/?ref=dcr

Starting the Parkinson’s Association in Arequipa

Speaking at a Lima event of the Parkinson’s Association

The process of starting the Parkinson’s association in my city is taking time. That is the way life is here in Peru as there is always paperwork and permissions and more paperwork to be done. But because of this delay I organised a more intimate meeting with a handful of people that I know to see if I could build up the trust between us. 

Edith (name changed) is a retired teacher who I have heard speak various times and always admired as she is so interactive and creative in the way she presents. I invited a group of pastor’s wives to my home, including Edith,  for a time to encourage one another and before long she mentioned she too has Parkinson’s disease. She didn’t know that exercise helps slow the advance of the disease. It was a surprise, but it shouldn’t be as my research shows that people with Parkinson’s (PWP) in Peru don’t have a clear understanding of how exercise rebuilds the nerve connections again and practice and movement help with coordination and walking.  To make a long story short it is exciting as Edith helped me host the first Parkinson’s association meeting in my home. Her talk were real blessing to others.

Another member is a lawyer Pablo (name changed) whose wife I know through my current circle. He is very capable in helping me with the paperwork for the association and also helping set it up legally.  His story is that he had been told he ‘shouldn’t dance or exert himself too much’. He actually struggled with this advice as he loved dancing but had to give it up. But scientific studies say the exact opposite. Dancing is an excellent form of exercise as the music helps move people too. Scientific studies say that while stretching is good but one needs to also get out of breath,  – which in Spanish is ‘agitarse’ – like agitate yourself a little. Dancing is great for Parkinson’s but so are running, walking, boxing, yoga and many other forms of exercise. They help with movement and prevent rapid disease progression. Exercise also helps with depression, and social interaction with exercise is great too. 

But this man has had the disease over 10 years, still works full time, and is now accustomed to inactivity. I have heard it said that people with Parkinson’s are resistant to exercise. This sounds strange but depression and apathy are also common and affect motivation. 

So pray for this new friend who wants to help with the association that he’ll have the time and energy to help and that also he can find the motivation to get exercising. I believe he can do it… he just doesn’t know it yet. His wife told me how amazingly smart he is and I don’t doubt it but sadly sometimes Parkinson’s affects so many parts of one’s life and this affects one’s confidence. 

It may all just take a little longer than I had planned but we had a lovely time together with just 5 of us in total. I hope we can integrate others soon. 

Visiting Parkinson’s Geneticist – Dr Nacho Mata

You might have seen me walking around WPC with a Peruvian beanie (warm) hat on. There was reason to my madness: I was trying to connect with people from South America but  there were very few of them. But then I heard about the legendary “Nacho Mata” – But I couldn’t find Nacho despite messaging him, so on went the hat and he spotted me easily leaving a session. 

Dr Mata had a huge interest in Peru, where I live, as his work is in genetic studies various countries in South America. He has found that Latinos have very little representation in the genetic studies done already so if cures or treatment was found it would be likely to benefit mainly European forms of Parkinson’s and not others. Nacho, originally from Spain,  he decided to study the South American variant of parkinson.

When we met at the WPC conference I asked if he could speak with the Peruvian Parkinson’s Association about Genetics (but basic level only). He willingly agreed and the association booked a hall and organised the event within just over a months notice. 

This talk was a great “Introduction to Parkinson’s Genetics” which should be repeated at WPC22.  It explained briefly causes and basics Parkinson’s and even used a Peruvian food analogy to keep them listening. Everyone should know to complement a Peruvian it is best to say “I love _____ (specific food). Smart! He had them hungry for more (pun intended). 

Only 20% of persons have a hereditary form of Parkinson’s and he encouraged PWP to enroll in genetic studies.  Association should also raise funds for research too, as that is how Nacho got his start in Parkinson’s research – the location Parkinson’s Association where he lived gave him a scholarship to do Parkinson’s research. He talks as if they’re his aunts and uncles and is so grateful to them. 

So thank-you to the World Parkinson’s Congress for making the connection possible. Interestingly enough through Nachos visit I have met several young neurologists who are passionate about helping patients. One even stopped me in the hall at a medical conference Nacho was teaching at and said “thanked you for coming and inspiring me to keep working in this area” as I’d shared briefly what it was like for People With Parkinson’s (PWP) in Peru. And how do I know ? I know because I interviewed 28 people so I could present a poster on the topic at WPC2019. Thanks for inspiring me to take their story to the world. 

I also had one young neurologist ask what was needed in Parkinson’s research. I pointed him to the patients ideas that came from WPC poster. I don’t know if he’ll do that topic but he’s more aware now and he wants to help organise a Parkinson’s conference next year for health professions and patients. Anyone else want to come and help us? I’ll take you out for same great Peruvian dish like “Lomo Saltado”. 

Lastly I met very innovative and well read twin doctors – One is a neurologist and the other is finishing rehabilitation speciality and they want to start a parkinson’s Centre in Lima. Yes! They’ve a huge heart to see things done well in Peru and I hope I can partner with them to meet their dream. 

These 3 doctors have confirmed that together we are coming to WPC2022 – Go team Peru!  From 1 in 2019 to 4 at a minimum in 2022. 

Thank-you Nacho for giving up your time to share your knowledge in Peru.


World Parkinson’s Day in Lima PERU

In my city people hide the disease but there is a Parkinson’s Association in Lima, so I hopped on a plane to see who I could meet. Well, providence stepped in… before I even got out of Arequipa I met a lady (and her son) whose father had Parkinson’s disease. I was able to chat with her about everything related and she happens to work in health insurance and can use her connections to find patients. She stated as we pulled into Lima “ Next year we’ll celebrate in Arequipa – even better than LIma”.

What a great start to my trip.

World Parkinson’s day is celebrated by people with Parkinson’s Disease and their families all around the world on 11th of April. In Lima there were a hundred people in attendance. There was a special guest, Carlos Alvarez, a comedian whose mother had died from the disease recently. He is helping get media attention and he’s already done that by making a short show about his experience and introducing some people with Parkinson’s and the issues they face.  

I also told my story of getting Parkinson’s disease and how important exercise has been for me. I told them about being an unexpected gymnast and I really connected with the audience who smiled or laughed at my jokes. There was even one lady who doesn’t know what rhetorical questions are but that made it fun too. I was able to make many new friends and interviewed about 11 people in person in Lima. The night ended with music and dancing which is a lot of fun. I’m very excited to see the future of the Association and how it’s growing and educating about parkinson’s disease.

Photos speak louder than words so enjoy.

Projects and persistence in gymnastics

To go along with the video I have renamed the blog “Handstand for Parkinson’s” and the website is www.handstandforparkinsons.com. I hope this won’t cause too much confusion.

The other news is that I am preparing a Poster “Living with Parkinson’s in Peru”. So I am super busy trying to interview people with the disease and write up their stories and creating charts. I have never done something like this and with the time limit so close (June). I am a bit overwhelmed and have ideas that I am struggling to put into action.

Thanks everyone for your votes and support with the video “Handstanding for Parkinson’s Disease”. I have been so blessed by comments and with votes. The winner isn’t announced until June, but voting has finished.

We’re preparing for our 3 month visit to Australia late May to August which is exciting too.

The fun news is that I am working on a follow-up video called “Before and After” about how my coordination, movement balance and strength  improved by doing gymnastics to combat Parkinson’s. It is half done so watch this space. I am relatively new to video editing so it is taking me time to learn but I’m advancing little by little.

Also I am back at the gym training pretty hard but like pride before the fall my handstand has gone backwards. Firstly my coach prefers that I don’t use a wall for support and secondly I am still frightened and lack consistency in my style. I need to keep practicing! Everyone has these valleys or plateaus but I am working hard. My next video will include some new tricks I am working on… of course I’m not looking like a pro but I’m moving forward nonetheless. April marks the first anniversary of my time in the gym.


Parkinson’s Disease Project Peru – Proyecto de Enfermedad de Parkinsons.

Spanish first today then English below.

This is Sammy photo bombing me. Not related but fun.

Este es el enlace para recaudar fondos para el proyecto (ya borre). Está en fase de desarrollo en este momento. Estoy tratando de encontrar pacientes e invito a reunirme regularmente y buscando socios con los que trabajar, como la asociación de Parkinson de PERU (que está muy interesada en trabajar con nosotros).

El objetivo es encontrar voluntarios internacionales y nacionales y fondos para venir a enseñar / demostrar las mejores prácticas en el tratamiento de la enfermedad de Parkinson, la educación sobre la enfermedad y el ejercicio.

El proyecto también examinará a cada nuevo contacto sobre sus experiencias con Parkinson en PERÚ. A continuación se muestra un borrador del plan del proyecto, pero las cosas dependerán de las encuestas y los recursos disponibles.

Objetivos del proyecto: Educación para la enfermedad de Parkinson en Perú

Parte 1: Educar a profesionales de la salud, fisioterapeuta, patólogo del habla. Las enfermeras y otros profesionales, como trabajadores sociales, nutricionistas, educadores de la salud y más jóvenes / seleccionados sufren o miembros de la familia capaces de ayudar con la educación de otros.

¿Cómo? Invite a extranjeros o expertos locales a capacitar al grupo principal / Capacitación interactiva y práctica / Pruebas / enseñar a un vecino.

Día 1- Enfermedad de Parkinson en profundidad: Dopamina / síntomas / Drogas vs Ejercicio / mitos / cirugía
Día 2- Discurso / Dieta / Depresión / Importancia de las reuniones / Organización /
Planificación de lecciones de planificación y libros de imágenes
Día 3/4 Entrene a los fisioterapeutas / baile u otros en PD warrior u otro programa similar
Parte 2: Día 5/6 – Clínicas en Lima: Enseñe nuevamente 1-4 en forma abreviada.
Días 7/8 (después del domingo) Trujillo regional y Arequipa – 4 capacitadores (incluyendo fisio / habla / nutricionista) van a cada ciudad.
Es un borrador del plan, pero como la gente me lo ha pedido, me parece bueno compartirlo. Del mismo modo, si deseamos ayuda, necesitamos compartir un plan claro, incluso si es necesario ajustarlo.

Si conoces a alguien que pueda ayudar, los expertos de Parkinson pueden compartir. Que puedan ofrecerse a ser voluntarios o hacer incluso más que en el plan. DREAM soñar grande … y trabajar duro en el interum.

This is the link to to project fundraiser (no deleted as it was old). It is in development stage right now. I am trying to find patients and invite to meet regularly and looking for partners to work with too like the Parkinson’s association of PERU (who are super keen to work with us).

The aim is to find international and national volunteers and funding to come and teach/ demonstrate best practices in Parkinson’s disease treatment, disease education and exercise.

The project will also survey each new contact on their experiences with Parkinson’s in PERU. Below is a draft of the project plan but things will depend on survey’s and resources available.

Project Aims: Education for the disease of Parkinson’s in Peru

Part 1: Educate health professionals, physiotherapist, speech pathologist. Nurses and other professionals, like social workers, nutritionist, health Educators and younger/ selected suffers or family member able to help with education of others.

How? Invite foreigners or local experts to train the core group/ Interactive and practical training/ Quizzes/ teach a neighbour.

  • Day 1-  Parkinson’s Disease in-depth : Dopamine/symptoms/Drugs vs Exercise/ myths/surgery
  • Day 2- Speech/ Diet/Depression/Importance of meetings/ Organisation /
  • Planning lesson planning and picture books
  • Day 3/4 Train physiotherapists / dance or others in PD warrior or other such program
  • Part 2: Day 5/6 – Lima Clinics: Teach 1-4 again in abbreviated form.
  • Days 7/8 (after Sunday off) Regional Trujillo and Arequipa – 4 trainers (including physio/speech/nutritionist) go to each city.

It is a draft plan but since people have asked I thought it good to share. Likewise if we want help we need to share a clear plan, even if it needs adjusting.

If you know anyone who could help – Parkinson’s experts then please share. Maybe they can offer to volunteer or do more than in the plan even. Lets DREAM big…..and work hard in the interim.

UPDATE; WE STILL HAVE THESE AIMS TO EDUCATE AND HAVE CONFERENCES BUT WE’RE DOING IT ON A SMALLER SCALE AND ON PAUSE BECAUSE OF CORONA

Saddened by Parkinson’s stories in Peru

Everyone is asking: Yes I am back at the gym training with my coach, trying crazy things. M y daughter, Amelia, has pointed out I am doing this wrong and how to fix it.
Little by little.

Thanks everyone for sharing and donating to the page: https://www.gofundme.com/hand-stand-for-parkinson-disease

Anything in addition to the target goes towards an educational campaign for patients, families and interested health professionals. Today I met with a Parkinson’s sufferer who has lost faith in doctores, who don’t give patients enough time to educate them properly, explain repercussions of drugs (like laxatives) nor the importance of nutrition, exercise, exercises for the voice, self care and the prevalence of depression and how to confront the disease. Looking back maybe I got more time, being the gringa because I was firing question after question despite noticing the doctores desire to say “next” written all over his/her face. But even then the responses were simple ” yes physiotherapy could help”. I am working one on one to educate but more is needed. I know I have been an encouragement but thinking of a team of people educated in Parkinson’s to deal with this nasty disease properly. People able to model love and kindness and willing to go to the regional centres too.

Peru and Parkinson’s Disease

According to the World Health Organisation 7 million people around the world have Parkinson’s disease. In Peru there are no official statistics but it is it is estimated that 30,000 people suffer with Parkinson’s and every year 2000-3000 new cases are found.

But from observation and comments of friends here, people hide disabilities or they can be undiagnosed so the numbers could be higher.

The treatment and lack of education about the disease is concerning.

Diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease in Peru is usually done by a neurologist but outside of the capital there are no Parkinson’s specialist neurologists (registered as Movement specialists)  and this can cause a variance of treatment. Unfortunately ‘Levodopa’ is prescribed from the beginning of the disease when it should be prescribed after about five years according to Doctor. Cesar Casteñada, Neurologo, Movement Disorders Specialist de Lima. The Parkinson’s medication “levodopa” has a shelf life and becomes less effective with time, and can even stop working after 5-10 years. Other drugs called Antagonists should be prescribed but they are expensive and may not be covered by health insurance in Peru (public or private).

Aside from drugs, the most important treatment that slows the diseases advancement is exercise but doctors here rarely mention this. One does not get a lot of time with the specialist and patient education is not a priority. It’s possible that doctors are not trained in what to recommend in terms of exercise therapy. Likewise referring people to a physiotherapist may lead to the same problem as in my experience in a regional city, physiotherapists lack training too.

What is needed is an expansion of the education about Parkinson’s disease for patients, their families and the medical community. Recently I attended the Parkinson’s Association meeting in Lima and found it to be so beneficial for the people emotionally as we connected with others like us. We became more educated about the disease and the event finished with some physical therapy which encouraged people and informed them about what they could do to help prevent the disease getting worse. We all participated and had fun.

Let me give you one case study that shows the benefits of education and of Parkinson’s sufferers meeting together. Over the last 6 months I have been chatting on WhatsApp and by phone with a lady of about 49 years of age with severe Parkinson’s. I’ve encouraged her about doing exercise, sent her videos of simple things she could do and articles to read about benefits of exercise and how to have a positive attitude. I pray for her too but unfortunately she never said she did any of the exercises. She was encouraged by our friendship but was often depressed and didn’t want to go out. She wanted to meet me and go to the Parkinson association meeting so she came all the way to Lima from a city 12 hours away. She attended the meeting and I could see that the people around her encouraging her  and challenging her about some of the things that I have been saying for months. When she got home she found it hard because her symptoms were getting worse and the drugs weren’t working as well as they did before, but then she wrote me saying she was meeting someone else with Parkinson’s disease and she was realising the importance of exercise and they were doing it together. She realised with her diseases advancement she had to exercise and stretch as the drugs didn’t help much. Amazing progress.

She benefited from both the educational meeting of the Parkinson’s Association and uniting with other people who had the disease – this was a great encouragement to her.  This is needed across Peru.

PS- There are many more stories to tell and more stories and background can be found in previous blogs.

Articles in Spanish Media:

https://elperuano.pe/noticia-parkinsonconociendo-enfermedad-48861.aspx

https://peru21.pe/amp/lima/lima-habria-10-000-personas-parkinson-72412

https://alicia.concytec.gob.pe/vufind/Record/UPCH_2f01252d8dff0d77e52d8faa46f8b494

hLa Enfermedad de Parkinson’s en Peru

Según la Organización Mundial de la Salud, 7 millones de personas en todo el mundo tienen la enfermedad de Parkinson. En Perú no hay estadísticas oficiales, pero se estima que 30,000 personas sufren de Parkinson y cada año se detectan 2000-3000 casos nuevos.
Pero a partir de la observación y los comentarios de amigos aquí, las personas ocultan discapacidades o pueden ser no diagnosticadas para que las cifras sean más altas.

El tratamiento y la falta de educación sobre la enfermedad es preocupante.
El diagnóstico de la enfermedad de Parkinson en Perú generalmente lo realiza un neurólogo, pero fuera de la capital no hay neurólogos especialistas en Parkinson (registrados como especialistas en Movimiento) y esto puede causar una variación del tratamiento. Desafortunadamente, “Levodopa” se prescribe desde el principio de la enfermedad cuando debe recetarse después de unos cinco años, según el médico. Cesar Casteñada, Neurologo, Especialista en Trastornos del Movimiento de Lima. El medicamento “levodopa” de la enfermedad de Parkinson tiene una vida útil y se vuelve menos efectivo con el tiempo, e incluso puede dejar de funcionar después de 5-10 años. Se deben recetar otros medicamentos llamados Antagonistas, pero son caros y es posible que no estén cubiertos por el seguro de salud en Perú (público o privado).

Aparte de los medicamentos, el tratamiento más importante que retarda el avance de las enfermedades es el ejercicio, pero los médicos aquí rara vez lo mencionan. Uno no tiene mucho tiempo con el especialista y la educación del paciente no es una prioridad. Es posible que los médicos no estén capacitados sobre qué recomendar en términos de terapia de ejercicios. Del mismo modo, remitir a las personas a un fisioterapeuta puede llevar al mismo problema que en mi experiencia en una ciudad regional, los fisioterapeutas también necesiten capacitación.

Lo que se necesita es una expansión de la educación sobre la enfermedad de Parkinson para los pacientes, sus familias y la comunidad médica. Recientemente, asistí a la reunión de la Asociación de Parkinson en Lima y descubrí que era muy beneficioso para las personas emocionalmente, ya que nos conectamos con otros como nosotros. Nos educamos más acerca de la enfermedad y el evento terminó con una terapia física que alentó a las personas y les informó sobre lo que podían hacer para ayudar a prevenir que la enfermedad empeorara. Todos participamos y nos divertimos.

Permítame darle un estudio de caso que muestra los beneficios de la educación y la reunión de los pacientes de Parkinson. Durante los últimos 6 meses he estado hablando en WhatsApp y por teléfono con una mujer de unos 49 años de edad con Parkinson grave. La alenté a hacer ejercicio, le envié videos de cosas simples que podía hacer y artículos para leer sobre los beneficios del ejercicio y cómo tener una actitud positiva. Ore por ella también, pero desafortunadamente ella nunca dijo que hizo ninguno de los ejercicios. Nuestra amistad la animaba pero a menudo estaba deprimida y no quería salir.
Quería reunirse conmigo e ir a la reunión de la asociación de Parkinson, por lo que vino a Lima desde una ciudad a 12 horas de distancia. Ella asistió a la reunión y pude ver que las personas a su alrededor la alientan y la desafían por algunas de las cosas que he estado diciendo durante meses. Veía la muy atenta. Cuando llegó a casa, lo encontraba difícil porque sus síntomas empeoraron y las drogas no funcionaban tan bien como antes, pero luego me escribió diciendo que estaba con alguien más con la enfermedad de Parkinson y que se estaba dando cuenta de la importancia del ejercicio y lo hacían juntos. Se dio cuenta de que con el avance de sus enfermedades tenía que hacer ejercicio y estirarse ya que las drogas no ayudaban mucho. Increíble progreso.

Se benefició tanto de la reunión educativa de la Asociación de Parkinson como de la unión con otras personas que tenían la enfermedad, esto fue un gran estímulo para ella. Esto es necesario en todo el Perú.

PD: Hay muchas más historias que contar y más historias y antecedentes se pueden encontrar en blogs anteriores.

Artículos en medios españoles esten arriba.